Chef Jun is back in his mother language showing us this great and simple chicken dish. You can follow this easily even if you do not speak Tagalog.
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Philippine cuisine consists of the food, preparation methods and eating customs found in the Philippines. The style of cooking and the food associated with it have evolved over many centuries from its Austronesian origins to a mixed cuisine of Malay, Spanish, Chinese, and American, as well as other Asian and Latin influences adapted to indigenous ingredients and the local palate. ‪http://www.howtocookgreatfilipino.com‬
Dishes range from the very simple, like a meal of fried salted fish and rice, to the elaborate paellas and cocidos created for fiestas, also spaghetti and lasagna of Italian origin. Popular dishes include: lechón (whole roasted pig), longganisa (Philippine sausage), tapa (cured beef), torta (omelette), adobo (chicken and/or pork braised in garlic, vinegar, oil and soy sauce, or cooked until dry), kaldereta (meat in tomato sauce stew), mechado (larded beef in soy and tomato sauce), ‪http://www.howtocookgreatfilipino.com‬
puchero (beef in bananas and tomato sauce), afritada (chicken and/or pork simmered in a peanut sauce with vegetables), kare-kare (oxtail and vegetables cooked in peanut sauce), pinakbet (kabocha squash, ‪http://www.howtocookgreatfilipino.com‬
eggplant, beans, okra, and tomato stew flavored with shrimp paste) crispy pata (deep-fried pig’s leg), hamonado (pork sweetened in pineapple sauce), sinigang ‪http://www.howtocookgreatfilipino.com‬
(meat or seafood in sour broth), pancit (noodles), and lumpia (fresh or fried spring rolls).

“Adobo/Inadobo” − cooked in vinegar, oil, garlic and soy sauce.
“Babad/Binabad/Ibinabad” − to marinate.
“Banli/Binanlian/Pabanli” − blanched.
“Bagoong/Binagoongan/ – sa Bagoong” − cooked with fermented fish paste bagoong.
“Binalot” – literally “wrapped.” This generally refers to dishes wrapped in banana leaves, pandan leaves, or even aluminum foil. The wrapper is generally inedible (in contrast to lumpia — see below).‪http://www.howtocookgreatfilipino.com‬